Using Science to Inform Policy and Mitigation of Anthropogenic Impacts on Long-Distance Migrations in the GYE

Event Type: 
GNLCC Webinar
Date and Time: 
Feb 28, 2018 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm MST

 

Presenter: Dr. Jon Beckmann, Science Director, Rocky Mountain West Program, Wildlife Conservation Society

In much of the world including the tropics, temperate and even Arctic systems, the persistence of long-distance migrations by mammals is threatened by development. Even where human population density is relatively low, there are roads, fencing, and energy developments that present barriers to animal movement. If we are to conserve species that rely on long-distance migration, then it is critical that we identify existing impediments to migration and how best to mitigate those impacts. Here I discuss how field-based science (e.g. GPS locations, Resource selection and Brownian bridge movement models) is being used to inform policy and mitigation efforts to protect three species of migrating ungulates in the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Jon Beckmann is the Director of Wildlife Science for the Rocky Mountain West program at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Along with numerous peer-reviewed publications, Jon is lead editor on a book titled Safe Passages: highways, wildlife and habitat connectivity. He has worked on a wide variety of issues and species ranging from ungulate migrations, to human-carnivore coexistence with bears, cougars, and jaguars among others.

Photo: Pronghorn antelope crossing over highway on an overpass in Wyoming. Credit: J Burrell/WCS

 

Pronghorn antelope crossing over highway on an overpass in Wyoming. Credit: J Burrell/WCS